Monday, April 25, 2022

"Love Will Go On Forever"

The article below was published in The Chicago Tribune on June 10, 1923. The columnist (Kick Korner) appears to have previously published a letter from someone who signed their comment as "Just Me". This is some of the response received for "Just Me's" daring to criticize Rudolph Valentino. I found it a fun read myself. 



15 comments:

  1. Just love this article, Thankyou for sharing with us. Nice to know someone stood up for Valentino and give him praise.

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    1. Well I got my copy of Norma today and it did not disappoint. As the above letters show, women had strong and fighting emotions for Rudy. I can't believe Nita Naldi became insanely jealous of little Norma on the set of Cobra. She really was a Vamp.

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    2. Imagine my hearing about that for the first time from both of her children. It was jaw-dropping but not entirely out of the realm of reality knowing Nita Naldi's reputation.

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    3. I will be doing a podcast on that at some point and going further into it.

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  2. Wasn't it Natacha who once said that Rudy brought out a woman's protectives instincts? That is definitely on display from these two fans. I did wince a bit at the "I thoroughly dislike the usual foreigner," but I suppose we can thank Rudy for doing his part to dissuade the common bigotry of the era. And, Comment 11:30 just jacked up my anticipation for the new book! Can't wait to get my copy!!

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  3. What comes through in both of the defenses is how completely Valentino’s authenticity and power as a lover distinguished him from his screen contemporaries. Valentino was living it on screen and it showed. In my view that still holds true today. Regarding Naldi and the revelation that she was envious of Norma on set - why is this not a surprise? All those train station photos of Naldi with Valentino and Rambova (looking very unhappy) show her to be angling to place herself on equal footing with Rambova as the center of Valentino’s attention. Just ridiculous. Rambova clearly wasn’t having it. It is very telling that Rambova never had one iota of further contact with Valentino after he died. Undoubtedly Rambova learned what a false friend Naldi was.

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    1. I cite some interviews Naldi gave shortly before Cobra began filming and she brags how she terrorized the younger children in the orphanage where she grew up. Bragging how she was a street fighter and famous for hair pulling. Those articles can be found online now and are very disturbing to me.

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    2. Meant to say in my previous post that Rambova never had contact with Naldi after Valentino died! I wonder too whether, if Naldi did the uncouth thing and revealed Rambova’s abortions to Valentino, Rambova didn’t cut Naldi off after finding that out.

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    3. Also, if Naldi’s voice/manner of speaking is any indication of her temperament and character, then I say she was a shrew.

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    4. I think Naldi was banished after she told Valentino about those procedures.

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    5. Some friend! Having a tryst with Valentino on his yacht and then spilling the news about Rambova's abortions certainly would not categorize Naldi as a BFF. I have always believed Naldi hoped to step into Rambova's shoes after she left Valentino. She may have been good for a sexual rendezvous, but brassy, low rent females were not Valentino's cup of tea.

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  4. What Naldi did to sweet little Norma Niblock was crummy.

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    1. I am fairly sure what happened to Norma, re: Naldi... was not so out of the ordinary in those days. The emphasis on that incident as far as Norma's children were concerned, was how she said she left for not feeling safe on the set. More anon on that.

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  5. According to the podcast, Norma's mother stated in an interview that she wished Norma had never won the Mineralava contest. Why? Was it simply because it was not lucrative enough for Norma?

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    1. Not entirely about the money at all. Norma was under contract and could not accept any offers that were not approved of by the company. As Norma's mother pointed out most of the runners-ups went on to have job offers and do well. Norma's story was not that way. Also Norma was made the object of cruel rumors and such which as mother pointed out were impossible to reverse. I explain this and more in detail in the book.

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