Wednesday, April 27, 2022

A Natural

I thought I would share the back cover of the new book, because I just love this image of Norma. And while she was a "secondary character" in Rudolph Valentino's story, there were a few extremely interesting secondary characters in her story. A mysterious doctor, the Los Angeles Police Chief and even her mother all played uniquely critical roles. And yes, she worked as a model which certainly shows in this image. She was a natural I think. 


 

20 comments:

  1. Norma is as lovely as any actress of the 1920s. She should have become a huge star!

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  2. Secondary? Perhaps. But how much space is taken up in online chats and Facebook forums about even lesser lights than Norma Niblock in the Valentino sphere? I've seen long threads about his dog, Kabar, for crying out loud! The Mineralava Tour was a turning point in Valentino's career, as well as a defining moment in Niblock's life. I would assume that when Valentino placed that crown on her head, it changed Norma's life forever. I, along with many others, have always wondered what happened to the Mineralava Beauty Pageant winner. Thanks to Ms. Zumaya, we can now find that out.

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    1. To the poster at 9:01 PM, the Facebook lemmings devote more passion and words to inanimate objects and pets on the Valentino forums than on human beings. Norma will have stiff competition from Yaqui, Centauar Pendragon and the newly restored stained glass window of the Constance Talmadge crypt.

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    2. Valentino never worked with either of the Talmadges. But because he allegedly gave Constance a book as a casual gesture of good will, forum attention is paid to the window of the Talmadge crypt? While Norma, handpicked as the fairest of the fair by Valentino, twice, has never been explored? What am I missing here?

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    3. Two words: Tino Rossi. Need I say more?

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  3. I bet Norma was a beautiful person inside too.

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    1. I haven't read the book yet (still waiting for its arrival), but I suspect you are right, 10:17.

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    2. Maybe she was I should not assume anything.

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    3. From the poster 10: 17.

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  4. My book has arrived! And the cover is exquisite. Can't wait to start reading!

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  5. My book arrived and I am enthralled! The photos are incredibly beautiful. I adore the details, such as Valentino greeting Norma with a hearty “Buon Giorno” on her first day on the Cobra set! The letter from an Italian admirer (one Domenico Verrecchia) ending with “Accept a hot kiss from a real hot blooded Italian (with your permission)!” On the darker side of the spectrum, there the is bone chilling account of Naldi’s gruesome treatment of Norma. What a lousy, nasty creep she was!

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    1. I was not so surprised to hear Norma's children telling her story of what happened on the set of Cobra. It was clear to me they brought her out there to avoid culpability in the lawsuit and I was glad to see that it did not completely deter Norma from continuing with her dream of being in the movies. More about that in a future podcast! Glad you are enjoying the book!!

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  6. I loved Valentino's friendly fawning toward Norma on Cobra and it makes me angry that the virago that is Naldi totally ruined what should have been Norma's entry into motion pictures.

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  7. The volume of fan mail Norma received is concrete proof that the Mineralava Tour, the contests, and the Madison Square Garden finale were huge happenings. No doubt the association with Valentino caused the enormous interest in the events, but I believe it was Norma's great beauty and lovely graciousness that generated the fan mail.

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  8. Hmmm, let's see, Lucille LeSueur was brought to Hollywood by Metro Goldwyn Mayer. Norma was brought to Hollywood because of Rudolph Valentino. So who wins bragging rights at the Studio Club, Lucille?

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    1. I can only imagine the cruel things that Ms. Naldi said to Norma. It's interesting that after Blood and Sand, she was never his leading lady again and he preferred Vilma Banky. My feelings toward Naldi have changed to negative.

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    2. Naldi appeared in two more films with Valentino after Blood and Sand. But I concur completely with your negative feelings.

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    3. Oh, I know a Sainted Devil must be one.

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    4. And, of course, Cobra.

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