Thursday, February 24, 2022

Regarding the History

I am mystified about the continual shaming of Renato and I, the tsk-tsking us for making a penny on our books. For the record, here is the deal with that.

We choose to publish quality, completely hand made books, now in full color and on good quality paper. This increases the cost of books considerably and we make a a few dollars on each one which has never yet covered our costs. If we chose to print them on newsprint and in black and white we might make more but we never choose to do that.  I think the content of our books demonstrates our motivation and a commitment to quality. 

Let me be the first to say there is no big money to be had in selling books on Valentino. It is a niche market at its best. The money to be had in the Valentino world is made by collectors.

They scavenge for deals, buy and resell and as I have discovered they could care less about a pieces provenance. A museum will have a curator research as long as it takes to ensure a piece is not stolen. In the world of Valentino collectors, its a wide open game. No one cares at all. The absolute only people who could make an issue of this would be the Alberto Valentino family. Sadly, I also learned long ago they don't care because they are dealers too. They should have long ago established a foundation and made all of the artifacts available to the public. 

Valentino's historical artifacts are vanishing for a dime and have been for a long time. And the hierarchy in the realm of this selling of Valentino's history is established in a way where dealers, masquerading as experts, are positioned as voices to be heard.

The reality now is that the one with the most toys sits in the big chair at the head of the table. So there is money to be had when it comes to Valentino; but not in books. How ludicrous to be endlessly shamed by those imo who should be shamed? Shamed for hoarding and marketing Valentino's history to suit their commercial needs. Historical artifacts belong in museums and archives available to the public. History matters. It is not for sale.

And why do they try so hard to demoralize us? Some say they are motivated by jealously, but I say it is money. And certainly not the 3.48$ we make selling a book. Big money has corrupted Valentino's history and deals are always in the works to resell a relic at a profit.

I stumbled into that Valentino black market world of shady collectors frothing at the prospect of another deal of a lifetime.  I exposed it in Affairs Valentino and they all know I did so honestly.

And the dealer who currently sits in that big chair at the head of the table? He runs a blog under the title of the book I wrote that exposed the very dealer racket he embraces and he has posted things like this (see below) to demoralize us for a decade now. He has been doing his worst towards us there for more than ten years and in keeping that blog online and active he does so today again.

He claims the blog is legitimate these days. Well, do tell. On March 3, 2018, he posted this to greet people Googling my book's title. I don't see so much jealously here but more fear; fear I might taint his market and a whole lot of impeding of our right to do business. 

#boycottMadAboutTheBoy #boycottWeNeverForget

11 comments:

  1. Fear certainly seems to be the case but there is a little bit of jealousy thrown in also from certain people. It is shameful that Rudy artifacts are being exploited even from the Valentino family and at Hollywood Forever where they hold their services. Even some people are wondering why that is happening at the crypt every year but it is about money.

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  2. Keep writing your books Evelyn and Renato. They are top quality books , and remember people who are interested in Valentino will order your books as one person wrote. Look forward to your new book.

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  3. Based upon the publicly available auction pricing information over the past decade or so, I would argue that there is little to be made even with respect to Valentino’s artifacts. None of the prices fetched are enough to change lives. It was particularly shocking to see the very low initial bidding prices for the Self Estate’s Valentino inventory. One wonders why Self would even bother directlng the sale of those items, when the revenue generated meant so very little in the context of his overall wealth. Wouldn’t the righteous gesture be restoration of the items to Alberto’s descendants? Was Self, in the end, the spiteful man that such behavior suggests? This is a fascinating question and, in all honesty, all of the players involved, with their subterfuge, backstabbing and false friendships, emerge as perfect jackasses. It has been abundantly clear since forever that the Valentino name is unable to move books or get films made. It the name did have that power, then Dark Lover would have had a second printing and reached more markets, and Edoardo Ballerinini, a talented and well connected actor who did a commendable job with his Mencken short would have been able to make his film “The Valentinos.”

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  4. Williams Self's motives for collecting always baffled me. But I have come to conclude that it was all about the thrill of the hunt for him. Once he obtained a sought after prize, the value dropped considerably in his eyes. Comment 6:03 stated it well. Self could have provided for the items to be returned to the Valentino family. Or he could have made sure his collection was donated to a museum. Instead, they were relegated to the auction block and scattered to the four winds. The contemporary collectors don't hold onto these artifacts for any sort of future value they might bring, because, let's face it, their selling price won't bring them any fortune. I believe it is the attention brought from hoarding these Valentino items that goads current collectors to wheel and deal in that narrow Valentino market. They occasionally present them on Facebook pages ("Looky what I have!") or they are called upon to appear in documentaries and podcasts as "experts" simply because they own Valentino swag. It's really sad that Valentino's possessions are used as pawns for someone's ego. I would rather read a good book.

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    1. And great books they are, well documented and well researched.

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  5. Excellent point above. Valentino relics aren’t acquired as investments which will appreciate in value over time. That’s not what they’ve ever been. Their worth is in their power to capture the attention of the Facebook lemmings and attendees at annual crypt gathering. What these folks surely discover quickly though is that the transitory morbid curiosity of the Facebook lemmings and crypt attendees doesn’t pack much of a punch. We’re not talking the beautiful people living La Dolce Vita here. My theory is that many of the relic purchasers act rashly because they’re newly besotted by Valentino’s raw sex appeal. They find the forums to flaunt their purchases, but discover that what goes not there is not compelling. Their interest wears out quickly and they re-sell the items shortly afterwards, at a loss.

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    1. I was contacted by someone who asked me if $9000.00 was a fair price for one letter written by Valentino and a book which allegedly belonged to him. I told them that was ridiculous. Then they said they already made the purchase. Seems like one small sale but over time that is a lot of money for a letter. I still think the book had no proof it was ever Valentino's. So it goes. All excellent points made in the previous comments.

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  6. The real tragedy is the loss of Valentino's legacy and his historical impact upon our culture. Those who acquire and hoard, but do not revere and share, Rudy's personal belongings and items of significance are selfish and immoral. It makes me want to vomit. How can they pretend to care about this talented, elegant man while they keep his precious items out of museums? Personal items tell a story and light the fire of curiosity in people who know nothing of this beautiful man. Think of what it means to see Marilyn Monroe's clothing on display in the Max Factor building in Hollywood. How does it feel to be inches away from the coat that President Lincoln wore to Ford's theater the night he was assassinated? What is it like to walk in the front doors of Elvis Presley's Graceland and view his world as he experienced it? A human being's legacy depends upon the things that we can gaze upon with our own eyes, touch, hear, and engage with. If you can be close to the tangible possessions of a historical figure then you can get to know them, understand them, become influenced by them, and develop a love and appreciation for them. It's such a waste. How tragic that people under 50 have no clue who Rudolph Valentino was and why his life was important. These so-called collectors are doing such damage to Rudy's memory. His contributions deserve to be revered and kept alive.

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  7. Post at 2:53 is beautiful and right on. It is unbelievable that a figure as tragic, troubled and utterly devoid of family as Monroe has a more robust and dignified inventory of her worldly goods, costumes, etc. thoughtfully preserved for public viewing than does Valentino. It’s disgusting in the extreme in fact, given that Valentino’s estate (unlike Monroe’s, which went to her acting teacher) was distributed to his “family.” One would expect blood to accord more respect and care to the deceased sibling/uncle they profited mightily from.

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    1. And one would expect a celebrity's family to not steal artifacts from other people and cause those to vanish too, whether turned into cash or used to barter favors.

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