Friday, June 3, 2022

"Which He Studied Religiously"

In regards to the previous posts, Valentino reading or not reading, his collections of books, etc., I share this clip from The Los Angeles Herald-Express, July 12, 1944 by George Ullman titled:

Dead Valentino Still Hero to His Agent, Real Rudolph is Divulged by Man Who Knew Him Best.

"Dodged Book Sets

Valentino was practically a chain smoker. He drank wines, loved good food, ate voraciously, cooked well and liked to cook. He appeared almost ordinary in golf or business clothes, was superb in anything approximating a costume, such as riding clothes, fencing apparel or lounging robes. He kept a large library of books with costume plates which he studied religiously. The remainder of his library was distinguished for rare volumes mostly in foreign languages. He hated sets of books and never bought them."


7 comments:

  1. Well, studying “costume plates” religiously ain’t tantamount to poring over Dostoevsky. Considering everything I have seen on the subject of Valentino and books, I find it impossible to believe that he was a voracious reader. And I like and admire him no less for this. Just as his hair loss, modest height, striking of both of his wives and syphilis do nothing to dim my appreciation.

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  2. I would say Rambova contributed mightily to his large library of books. I would not say Valentino was an intellectual, nor did he want to be. I think he had a very inquisitive nature, but he wasn't going to crack a book to satisfy his curiosity. Rather, he indulged himself in the kind of life he desired.

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    1. I would agree 100%. Most definitely Rambova's influence.

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  3. But what of all of those volumes from "Valentino's Library" (complete with post mortem bookplate) that one TRT has bought, sold and traded at a premium over the years?

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    1. I have heard from a couple of folks who bought some of those books and so many are lost into oblivion, spread far and wide. Perhaps... as in one case I heard about... turned into Valentino collages. So awful.

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  4. Awhile back, Terhune was boosting on WNF about having just acquired even more volumes of those books that have the after-Valentino's death-applied bookplates. He delighted in the fact that he had made the book purchases from someone who didn't know what they had value wise. Sounded like he took advantage of an unsuspecting person.
    His second-in-command Hill immediately gushed (for all to see on FB) that she looked forward to seeing these newly acquired 'treasures' on her next visit to the commander-in-chief of the VSC.
    She enables his hoarding. Yuck.

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    1. Collector Terhune, Collector Hill et al should know better than to gloat publicly about getting a deal from someone who did not realize what they had. If they are such "experts" then they should have some responsibility to inform people factually what they have "value-wise"? This is exactly why people with a financial interest in a relic should never be asked to authenticate it. It also speaks volumes as to what these collectors perceive as "value". The value of Valentino artifacts is in the history and not the black market value, i.e. selling through aliases according to Terhune. Getting the lowest price on a "deal" does not define its value as an historical object. All of these things belong in a museum and not squandered away as personal "deals" made, sold at a profit through alias account or used as a tad of ego balming ooh and ahh in front of Rudolph Valentino's final resting place.

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