Saturday, May 14, 2022

The Line in the Sand

I will admit I really felt the podcast we just posted on the Pink Powder Puff Editorial. The bullying aspects of the entire incident are something all too familiar to us. Baltasar Cue called it Valentino's "transcendental anguish", a phrase we understand. 

It was all too easy to mock Valentino during that summer of 1926 and this snarky cartoon (see below) is a prime example I think. Mocking his line in the sand and his, "I'm mad as hell and I am not going to take it anymore". 

I guess the joke is that editors are notoriously scrawny so now they have to beef up to defend their writing. I wonder if Valentino saw this cheesy and insulting cartoon which demeans his reaction entirely. 

13 comments:

  1. Your podcast on the Pink Powder Puff incident is a riveting take. Do you think Valentino was aware that Vivaudou was probably behind it?

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    1. I would think Valentino was not so fond of Vivaudou and could well have suspected him, i.e. the history of that pink powder.

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  2. It îs very sad that Valentino was affected so much by that editorial, which was indeed unfair,ean and ugly. However, maybe it wasnt a good PR move from him to challenge The writer (I suppose this idea came from Pola?). Maybe if he hâd a better PR reacționa to it( or been better advised) , it might not have gotten so out of proporțion. Just a thought.. And I am not condonning în any way The writer of The article. Valentino was definitely The victim în this case, but maybe a better handling of The incident from a PR Point of view might have done a better "damage control" for Rudy and his reputation and implicitly, his emoțional state

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    1. I don't think Pola Negri had any influence over Rudy's decisions.

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  3. It's a shame Rudy had to constantly defend himself against lies about him. and it has not stopped. I hope his family keeps standing up for him.

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    1. Unfortunately, Valentino did not live long enough to have a family of his own. So there has never been a “family defense” of him.

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    2. I think his family has defended him over the decades in different ways. Alberto and Jean certainly sued and sued again as far as movies went and even protested of the production of "Ciao, Rudy". Post Alberto and Jean, they have not defended him from the horrendous fictionalization nor defended us from the abuse we take everyday as we share new discoveries. I am not sure what they defend actually now and I wish they could find some way to set it right. If not to defend their relative but out of moral motivation.

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  4. Ms. Zumaya, do you know what kind of effect Rudy's death had on Norma Niblock?

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    1. Norma was in Los Angeles when Valentino died, living with her father and working in Hollywood as a designer for a catering business. There is no detailed account of her direct reaction to his death. I asked her daughter Sally that question and she answered that she was sure her mother was very sad when Valentino died because she considered him a friend. Norma had a large framed photo of Valentino which moved around with her at that time. Valentino inscribed it to Norma and had it framed for her. I would think that portrait would have had more meaning for her after his death.

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  5. I am curious if The Valentino family have any financially gain from His legacy : artistic rights, etc or are they all public domain by now? If they dont have any financial interest, it might explain în part why they are not making more effort to defend his truth, or maybe they just dont have The money Power to do this în a very visible way

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    1. I agree, Casandra. However, one would think family honor trumps $$$.

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    2. It would not cost them a penny to issue a statement deploring the tactics used by certain collectors and their assorted sycophants. Their not doing so makes them complicit in it all imo. And by affiliating with the crypt service emcee, they go further than any implication of complicity.

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  6. Gilligan’s IslandMay 16, 2022 at 11:41 PM

    The code of conduct adopted by Valentino’s now extremely remote living relatives appears to be “dignified silence above the fray.” Although, they should know that it doesn’t look like dignity to everyone. They have certainly shared very little about their relative over the decades and done very little to further public understanding. Perhaps the assumption that they are the inheritors of rich family lore about Valentino is a false one.

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