Monday, May 16, 2022

Can't Blame it On the Pups

November 22, 1925 was the day Natacha's dogs made news. Both Natacha and Rudy made bitter comments about their separation and it is not, imo a simple story. So many factors factoring in. But the press seized on her calling her dogs her "babies" and that was the theme in the syndicated articles. I think it unfair the press does not mention the stature of her career which they demean. When Valentino met Rambova she was working on DeMille and Nazimova projects, placing her at the top of her field and a success at a young age. But imo her marriage to Valentino cost her that career but she could not see that here. Love is blind. 

 


9 comments:

  1. The shade these two are throwing each other via the press is pretty sad. The "don't worry, the receipts in New York were all the bigger after my wife announced her suit against me" is 1920s snark X 10, Rudy! I'm sure both of them regretted this public sniping at each other later on. It's easy to see that the breakup deeply hurt them and the lashing out only confirms it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think this proves their marriage was not "arranged" or their relationship "platonic". And despite the fast divorce, they reunited before Valentino died. And all of the talk about children, careers, etc. was a cover for the reality they were facing. It is sad, I agree 3:02.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This newspaper article is proof their marriage was not arranged as some people claimed that it was. I remember looking at one photo of their wedding day, Rudy was looking at Natacha with love in his eyes, anyone could see how much he loved her.

      Delete
  3. It is rather disconcerting to hear Valentino sound so ruthlessly pragmatic: “as long as I have to get my living from audiences of young women …………”. This was unquestionably a part of his personality however, and those who dismiss him as business challenged and prone to manipulation by others should understand this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually I heard this from a contemporary celebrity ( I think it was Gerard Butler if I'm not mistaken) saying that he îs very well aware of The fact that his most loyal fans are women and most likely if he were to get married he would loose much of his audience. And also, when he Will grow older, which happens often Times. I find The fact that Valentino even în those early days of Hollywood realised and admit it în such a Frank way is a sign of intelligence and being a down so earth, realistic guy

      Delete
    2. I just realized that Valentino probably died a happy man. They didn't tell him he was dying. As far as he knew he was getting back together with Natacha. His new movie was a hit and he was surrounded outside by adoring fans.

      Delete
    3. The doctor who attended him at the end, Dr. Meeker wrote Valentino biographer Jeanne De Recqueville and said Rudy did know he was dying. His letter to her is included in her book. But I think he died at peace knowing he and Natacha made their peace.

      Delete
    4. The correspondence De Recqueville includes in her book is exceptionally valuable, i.e. letters from Dr. Meeker, Rene Clair, Alberto Valentino and others.

      Delete
    5. I do think there is something to 9:39's comment. I don't think Valentino was moping around New York in those final weeks, drinking himself into oblivion, despairing of life as he is usually depicted. I do think his health was getting worse, but Son of the Sheik was a huge hit, he was stepping out with the gorgeous Marion Benda, and socializing with his friends. I don't think he was miserable, until he finally collapsed. Then he reconciled with Rambova.

      Delete